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Vol. 12 No. 7: 25-31 July 2014

 

Budget Vote Speech by Mduduzi Manana

Budget Vote Speech by Mduduzi Manana
The good story about the Post-School System
The Minister of Higher Education and Training has through his budget speech today, given much impetus on the good story about the post-school system that we are desiring for this country. Whilst the next five years of this government will seek to consolidate the gains of the last 20 years of our Democracy, the department has equally redefined the trajectory of the Post School Education and Training system going forward. This new trajectory is aimed at ensuring that our Education and Training system breaks the vicious cycle of unemployment, inequality and poverty...

...we will continue building the system guided by the imperatives of our second phase of the transition and further guided by the National Development Plan and the White Paper on Post School Education and Training… Our target is to produce 19 000 competent artisan candidates by the 31st of March 2015... >>> More

Budget Vote Speech by Mzwandile Masina

Budget Vote Speech by Mzwandile Masina
Intensify Black Participation In Productive Sectors
"...The groundwork required to fulfil these imperatives has been done…20 years of freedom has also allowed us to analyse the extent to which real BEE has been achieved; the extent to which black people are not just minority shareholders with little board influence and strategic oversight; the extent to which black people have direct executive responsibility for major enterprises in manufacturing, agriculture, mining and services.
Our sense is that although progress on the whole has been significant, we need to be more ambitious. The entrepreneurial, executive and management talents of black people have not yet been fully unlocked and indeed in some sectors established firms continue to create barriers to entry for new, black-owned enterprises. There is therefore a need to intensify black participation in...">>> More
Deliberation on Presidency Budget Vote Speech by Buti Manamela

Deliberation on Presidency Budget Vote Speech by Buti Manamela
An Art Of Convenience...Into Mass Marketing
"...imports especially for Government procurement, create jobs in other countries, create profits in other countries, and moreover is an important contributor to SA's current account deficit. In many developed and developing countries this is a non-issue, Government buys from its domestic suppliers as a first-principle. We will work towards meeting the target of 75% of Government procurement being provided by local manufacturers and producers as outlined in the ruling party's manifesto. However the government cannot drive this industrialisation agenda alone...">>> More

Viewpoint by Sicelo S. S. Shembe Viewpoint by Sicelo S. S. Shembe
26 July - Milestone in the Struggle for African Freedom
"...imports especially for Government procurement, create jobs in other countries, create profits in other countries, and moreover is an important contributor to SA's current account deficit. In many developed and developing countries this is a non-issue, Government buys from its domestic suppliers as a first-principle. We will work towards meeting the target of 75% of Government procurement being provided by local manufacturers and producers as outlined in the ruling party's manifesto. However the government cannot drive this industrialisation agenda alone..."” >>> More

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Budget Vote Speech by Mduduzi Manana

Budget Vote Speech by Mduduzi Manana

THE GOOD STORY ABOUT THE POST-SCHOOL SYSTEM

Budget Vote Speech by the Deputy Minister of Education and Training, Mr Mduduzi Manana MP, National Assembly, Cape Town

22 Jul 2014

Honourable House Chairperson;
Minister of Higher Education and Training;
Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee, Honourable YN Phosa;
Director-General and Staff of the Department;
Heads and Executives of all our Post-School Entities and Institutions;
Honoured Guests;
Ladies and Gentlemen and Comrades.

Honourable Chairperson, it gives me great pleasure to address this House today on Budget Vote Number 17 of the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET). This first budget of the 5th Parliament consolidates the good story that was clearly articulated by the President of the Republic of South Africa, His Excellency JG Zuma in both his 2014 State of the Nation addresses and elaborated further by Honourable members of this House during the State of Nation debates.

The Minister of Higher Education and Training has through his budget speech today, given much impetus on the good story about the post-school system that we are desiring for this country. Whilst the next five years of this government will seek to consolidate the gains of the last 20 years of our Democracy, the department has equally redefined the trajectory of the Post School Education and Training system going forward. This new trajectory is aimed at ensuring that our Education and Training system breaks the vicious cycle of unemployment, inequality and poverty.

Honourable Members, we will continue building the system guided by the imperatives of our second phase of the transition and further guided by the National Development Plan and the White Paper on Post School Education and Training.

Our road to 2030 will be a radical one, but it will be achieved in steps, the first of which will be the 2014/19 Medium Term Strategic Framework, which articulates the mandate given to Government, a mandate that has at its apex the priority of education and training.

Honourable Chairperson, let me now focus and unpack a few key strategic objectives of the department as they relate to Artisan Development, Youth Development Programmes, Career Development and the Apply Now Campaign, improving access to post school education and training for people with disabilities and our endevours to eradicate the impact of the dual epidemics on HIV and TB in order to promote a sense of healthy well-being within our sector.
Honourable Members;
Fellow South Africans;

I am pleased to announce that we have now put in place the building blocks for the rebuilding of our artisanal training system in the country. Our renewed focus on intermediate skills, especially artisan related skills is aimed at aggressively supporting Government's push for infrastructure development and industrialisation as key drivers of economic growth.

In February this year, I launched the 'Decade of the Artisan' advocacy programme borne out of the successful 'Year of the Artisan' programme in 2013 where we managed to reach every corner of this country conversing with our young people on the importance of taking up artisanship as a career of choice.

Our target is to produce 19 000 competent artisan candidates by the 31st of March 2015 and This drive is geared towards achieving the National Development Plan target of producing 30 000 competent artisans annually by 2030, and with resources allowing we will be able to achieve the NDP target earlier than directed.

In order to achieve this, we will bolster the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations, whose remit will include operationalisation of the National Artisan Moderation Body. We are strategically positioning our Technical and Vocational Education and Training (Technical and Vocational Education and Training) Colleges to play a decisive role in the production of high calibre artisans.

Honourable Chairperson;

There are also interesting developments in the area of renewable energy which the department has decided to support. The Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) in partnership with an initiative called Green are establishing the South African Renewable Training Energy Centre (SARETC) at the Bellville Campus of CPUT, the first of its kind in the county and the continent.

Our department, through the National Science Foundation (NSF) has allocated R105 million over the three year period (2013/16) for infrastructure and initial running costs. This initiative, Honourable Chairperson, takes queue from the bold announcement on energy renewal made by the President during the State of the Nation Address.

As part of enabling SETAs to contribute to and complement national efforts aimed at reducing unemployment and alleviating poverty especially amongst the South African youth, I requested both the Manufacturing and Engineering Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) and the Energy and Water SETA to develop a solar geyser installation programme and train the youth of Mitchells Plein and Khayelitsha here in the Western Cape province and thus shield them from the high temptation of drug usage, crime, idleness and destructive acts to themselves and their communities. I am happy to report that training of 500 learners will commence this week giving credence to our commitment of green skills for sustainable communities.

Honourable Speaker;

In 2013, I launched World Skills South Africa and subsequent to this, the department initiated a process to establish and operationalise a formal governance structure for World Skills South Africa. The World Skills competition offer aspiring artisans a platform to demonstrate their knowledge and skills whilst at the same time compete with their peers from more than 70 countries of the world.
In the interim the SETA CEO Forum Artisan Development Sub Committee is overseeing preparation for the next World Skills Competition in Brazil to be held from 11 - 16 August 2015. This Sub Committee is the most appropriate structure to utilise as the occupations involved in the world skills competition are artisan related. The South African National competition will take place from 28-31 January 2015 in Cape Town and this will be preceded by Regional Competitions, hosted by TVET Colleges, in which 23 Trades from 7 different SETA's will participate. Employers from the various sectors are pledging their support through providing sponsorships, training of participants and equipment for the competition.

Let me take this opportunity and inform the House that last week on the 14th of July 2014, I met with the Vice-President of Samsung Dr Ji Ho Song and his delegation and I took them through a number of our TVET programmes and visited selected institutions in the Western Cape. We are forming a partnership with Samsung and they have made an undertaking to sponsor the South African national winners in IT Software Solutions, IT Network Systems and Web Design to attend a 3 weeks of International Competition training in South Korea in September this year.

Honourable Chairperson;

Last year, I visited two mining communities in the North West province on an outreach programme and made a commitment to the vulnerable youth who urged me and showed willingness to acquire skills in order to better their lives and those of their families. I am happy to report that together with the Mining Qualifications Authority, we have trained 1000 young people in portable skills and entrepreneurship around a number of our mining communities.

The Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA) allocated an amount of R25 million for training in bricklaying, plumbing, electricity (house wiring), life skills, business and entrepreneurial skills. Some of the youth were trained in level 1 and 2 Mining in which they will be opportuned to permanently join the nearby mines. One of my special guests today in the public gallery is Mr Richard Mbulelo who trained in electricity basic house wiring and advance entrepreneurial skills and who gave a moving testimony that the programme has indeed enabled him to be confident as a young South African.

These programmes were implemented in various municipalities such as Dr Kenneth Kaunda Municipality, Matlosana Municipality, Sekhukhune District Municipality, Merafong Municipality and Bojanala Municipality.

At the programme launch and certification event in both Klerksdorp and Carletonville, I made a call to mining houses to join government in the skilling of young people and I am happy to report that Anglo Gold Ashanti has since trained an additional 315 young people in Level 1 & 2 mining courses. Dilokong Chrome in Limpopo has also commenced with the training of portable skills to 50 unemployed young people. This particular mine has committed to place some of these young people in infrastructure development programmes and the remainder will be absorbed in the municipal infrastructure programme.

Honourable Members;

An area that has been neglected in the Post School Education and Training system has been the provision of education and training for people with disabilities in our Universities and Colleges. As the Minister has indicated and in line with the White Paper, we intend developing a comprehensive policy and an implementation framework for people with disabilities.

The Minister of Higher Education and Training has mandated me to oversee this process and in this regard a Ministerial Committee on the development of the policy framework for disability has been established. Our Director General is in the process of calling for nominations for members of the Ministerial Committee.

The intention really is to develop a framework that will set out norms and standards for the integration of student and staff with disabilities in all aspects of university and college life. This approach will attempt to prescribe directives for reasonable accommodation of persons in the education and training system that have disabilities.

We are very serious Honourable Members and committed to the cause of improving access to post-school education and training for persons with disability.

Honourable Chairperson, one of my very important tasks is to oversee the initiative to develop and strengthen the HIV, TB, STIs prevention, treatment-care and support interventions in the entire post school sector. We are doing this in response to the South African National Strategic Plan on HIV, STIs and TB, 2012/16.

The Higher Education AIDS led by Dr Ramneek Ahluwalia is our vehicle to implement comprehensive health care programmes within all the South Africa's public higher education institutions and technical and vocational education and training (TVET) college campuses catering for close to 2 million young population of students and staff.

Higher Education and Training HIV/AIDS Programme (HEAIDS) has also begun implementing comprehensive programmes that respond to the impact of the dual epidemics (HIV, STIs and TB) in the higher education and training sector through the launch of our own Strategic Plan called the "Higher Education and Training Strategic Framework on HIV/TB/STI" that I launched on the 1st of December 2012.

Since I announced the extension of the HEAIDS Programme into the further education and training (FET) college sector in December 2012 as a landmark victory, all our programmes have been extended to students in the TVET sector that have never received such support in the past.

I am proud to announce that through a recent 2014 independent national survey, it has been shown that the Campaign has been able to get a total of 40% first time testers to be screened for HIV, STIs and TB in the sector, whilst a total of 75% were motivated to test and gained knowledge on HIV/TB/STIs and other health care services due to the massive advocacy and awareness done through the HEAIDS First Things First Campaign.

This means that the young people in our country are able to access HIV prevention, treatment, care and support hence a healthy and prolonged life style for them, their families.

Honourable members, we have an obligation to engage our youth if we are to build a strong, skilled and capable workforce and in this regard HEAIDS is currently implementing youth dialogues in communities around the dual epidemics, a programme I launched at the University of the Witwatersrand towards the end of the 4th administration.

Honourable Chairperson;

We remain committed to the course of sending graduates to study abroad in order to grow our own skills base as a country. During the debate on the State of the Nation address, I outlined our plans and gave clear figures of students who are off-shore and those that we intend sending abroad this year. One of my special guests today in the public gallery is Ms Tshepang Mashiloane who is part of the group of 15 students who will be departing for Russia in September this year to study towards her Master's degree in Vocational Education. We have resolved, Honourable Members, to take up scholarship offers that are strong and worthwhile for our country but we will equally be spending from our own purse in so far as sending capable students to excellent and world class universities is concerned.

Honourable Members, in June 2012, we launched the 'Apply Now' campaign with an aim of creating awareness of career options and application procedures to be followed for post-school education and training. The intention was to reduce long queues and some of the chaos that generally take place at most of our universities at the beginning of each academic year.

I am pleased to announce that the campaign has been a resounding success and in this coming year I will be conducting Student Representative Council (SRC) roadshows where I will meet university and college SRCs to engage on many matters of concern as well as how we can work together to minimise students protests especially at the beginning of each academic year.

In so far as career development is concerned, we hosted our 5th Annual Mandela Week Career Festival at the Sedibeng TVET College in Gauteng last week which is our flagship programme in partnership with our entities and stakeholders aimed at providing career information, advise and guidance to learners in rural and under-served areas.

You may be aware, Honourable Members, that we have begun a process of coordinating central applications to our universities through the Central Application Clearing House process and I'm happy to announce that we will be establishing the central application service which will provide a one-stop shop for application to universities and ensure that learners need only to make one application, indicating their preferences, so that these applications can be forwarded to their preferred institutions but as well direct applications to institutions that are not fully subscribed. Honourable members, this system is expected to go on-line by 31 March 2018 and by 31 March 2019 for the remainder of the post-school system.

Honourable Chairperson, we are set to move South Africa forward and we remain unperturbed in our resolve to change the lives of our people for the better.

Honourable Chairperson, let me conclude by thanking the President for yet again inviting me to his executive and the support he continues to give us, my outmost thanks goes to the Minister of Higher Education and Training for his guidance and support, I would also like to thank the Director-General of the department, his deputies and all staff for the work accomplished and for the work still to be done. I also wish to thank the Chief of Staff in the Ministry, my head of office and staff for their tireless work and willingness to work beyond the call of duty. Finally, I would not have been able to serve in this calling without the unflinching support of my family, my friends and my comrades.

Honourable Chairperson;

We remain committed to the ideals of the Freedom Charter; equally we are convinced that our programmes are in line with the principles of the National Development Plan more especially with regard to economic growth and skilling the nation. Through our Post School Education and Training, we will no doubt move South Africa forward.
I thank you.

(Mduduzi Manana is a member of the ANC Youth League and its former NEC Member but his speech here is on his capacity as the Deputy Minister of Higher Education. The speech appears here because it directly deals with matters that relates to young people.)

Budget Vote Speech by Mzwandile Masina

Budget Vote Speech by Mzwandile Masina

INTENSIFY BLACK PARTICIPATION IN PRODUCTIVE SECTORS

Department of Trade and Industry Budget Vote Address delivered by Mr Mzwandile Masina, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry

23 Jul 2014

Chairperson of the National Council of Provinces;
Chairperson and Honourable Members of the Portfolio Committee;
Minister Davies and Minister Zulu;
Deputy Minister Thabethe and other Deputy ministers present
MECs and Heads of Departments;
DG October, officials of the Department Trade and Industry and the Council of Trade and Industry Institutions (COTII);
Leaders of Organised Business and Labour;
Distinguished guests;
Ladies and gentlemen

Honourable Chairperson, the convening of this our fifth democratic Parliament happens at a time when the global economy is showing signs of a strengthening recovery. This poses both challenges and opportunities for the South African economy. A key challenge is that as economic growth accelerates in SA, we may become complacent and the President's call for Radical Socio-economic Transformation may not be realised within the required time.

As the ANC led Government we are humbled by the overwhelming electoral victory as it affirms the confidence our people have in us. The renewed mandate means we need to accelerate Radical Socio-Economic program to deal decisively with poverty, unemployment and inequality that continue to haunt the toiling masses of our people.

This would be a grave mistake; as we saw in the years immediately before the 2007/8 Global Financial Crisis, even when the SA economy grew by 5% and above, it did not result in improved employment.

Many other developing countries have experienced this; the benefits of high rates of economic growth can easily be captured by 'advantaged' parts of society to the detriment of the poor and the unemployed.

When President Zuma called for Radical Socio-economic Transformation, he called on all South Africans to build an inclusive economy anchored in a large and growing industrial sector underpinned by broad-based black economic empowerment.

In the coming financial year, the dti will continue to improve implementation of the Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) and the Mineral Beneficiation Action Plan. We will also move decisively to develop bolder and sharper instruments to support black industrialists and youth entrepreneurs, but more importantly ensure they are viable and sustainable.

Honourable members, one of the yardsticks that can be used to measure the impact of the work of the dTI in transforming the economy as well as broadening participation is the extent to which black people are meaningfully participating in the economy.

The groundwork required to fulfil these imperatives has been done in terms of policy frameworks. These include the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act 53 of 2003 which was enacted to advance economic transformation and economic participation of black people in the economy; the Black Economic Empowerment codes of good practice; the National Industrial Policy Framework; and IPAP. The BEE Act and its codes were amended last year to close a number of loopholes in terms of dealing with firms who engage in 'fronting' and to better align our B-BBEE imperative with the need to promote industrialisation of the SA economy.

However, 20 years of freedom has also allowed us to analyse the extent to which real BEE has been achieved; the extent to which black people are not just minority shareholders with little board influence and strategic oversight; the extent to which black people have direct executive responsibility for major enterprises in manufacturing, agriculture, mining and services.

Our sense is that although progress on the whole has been significant, we need to be more ambitious. The entrepreneurial, executive and management talents of black people have not yet been fully unlocked and indeed in some sectors established firms continue to create barriers to entry for new, black-owned enterprises.

There is therefore a need to intensify black participation in productive sectors especially in sectors prioritised in IPAP such as Plastics and Chemicals, Automotives, Agro-processing, Metal fabrication and downstream mineral beneficiation to name but a few.

To facilitate a more meaningful participation of black people in the mainstream economy we will look at various ways of developing and sustaining black industrialists. I will lead a team that will work closely with the Presidential B-BBEE Advisory Council to develop specific actions in this regard. One such action will be the creation of a targeted incentive to support black entrepreneurs entering the industrial sector, including in the film and to focus more on the talent support, which is often ignored.

Honourable Members, Government's Infrastructure build programme as well as Government's procurement of goods and services for its normal operations; provide a crucial opportunity for deepening and transforming the industrial base of South Africa.

Assisting local enterprises to provide these goods and services will create jobs in South Africa, develop skills and create a springboard for these enterprises to progressively develop their capabilities and eventually enter the export market. Doing so is not just our patriotic duty, it is an economic and financial necessity.

Honourable members, imports especially for Government procurement, create jobs in other countries, create profits in other countries, and moreover is an important contributor to SA's current account deficit. In many developed and developing countries this is a non-issue, Government buys from its domestic suppliers as a first-principle. We will work towards meeting the target of 75% of Government procurement being provided by local manufacturers and producers as outlined in the ruling party's manifesto.

However the government cannot drive this industrialisation agenda alone: there is a clear need for partnerships with the private sector and broader society if we are to drive this agenda successfully. In an effort to develop such partnerships, in the past five years the dti introduced the "taking the dti to the people", a campaign designed to create awareness of products and services offered by the dti and its agencies and also serve as a platform for engagement between the dti and its stakeholders.

In this past financial year we have taken the dti to various communities including Hamaskraal in Gauteng, Zebediela in Limpopo, Bushbuckridge in Mpumalanga, Denneysvillie in Free State, Ixopo in KwaZulu-Natal and Mantsere in North West. During these engagements communities are encouraged to establish businesses and cooperatives to assist them address poverty and unemployment and they are also made aware of the types of assistance they can expect from the dti
The focus over the medium term will be on more engagements with industry and this campaign will now be called "taking the dti to the factories". We believe that this creates new opportunities for the private sector to engage with the dti, and also for the dti to provide information on the kinds of support available to the private sector.

Given challenges of unemployment in the country, we are calling on the private sector to utilise state instruments to fully participate in the "One Company One Job" initiatives, the campaign will be driven by my office working with business, labour and civil society.

We will further monitor government expenditure linked to ruling party commitments on job creation, including imposing requirements to companies doing business with the state at all levels. This approach will be extended to companies accessing state incentives, companies requiring licensing or importing and exporting entities.

Unemployment can no longer be a question of statistics, we need to act now and be decisive as the ruling party with an overwhelming mandate from the masses of our people who continue to suffer in the hands of white monopoly capital that still dominate our economic landscape.

We will also use the opportunity to engage the private sector on its reluctance to follow Government's lead of targeting 75% local content in its procurement. It is essential that Government, Business and Labour support local industries and deepen industrial capabilities where these are inadequate.

Minister Davies was correct to articulate that we are now more determined to implement a high impact industrial policy that would respond to imminent threat of de-industrialisation and lay a basis for the creation of a stronger industrial base. Equally, the Minister was correct to remind all of us about designated goods and services to be procured to meet the said percentage.

Indeed we should welcome the next designation of strategic products to be added but we also have an obligation to ensure that the R1 trillion that government spent per annum procuring goods and services does not reduce our people to only focus on non-core items or crumbs of this economy.

The youth forms a large part of our population and it is the segment most affected by unemployment with an unemployment rate of 36.1% (using the narrow definition) and 47.7% (using the broad definition) according to Statistics SA for the 1st quarter of 2014. The statistics are alarming and cannot be ignored, hence it is more and more critical to introduce interventions directed at the youth.

Last year, we launched the Youth Enterprise Development Strategy (YEDS 2013-2023) that aims to mitigate the challenges that constrain youth development such as low economic participation, lack of critical managerial skills, difficulties in accessing finance and economic opportunities. Over the medium term our focus will be on implementing the YEDS in order to increase youth economic participation.

This house will agree with me that communication is very crucial for the success of any policy implementation. We therefore organised workshops to introduce the YEDS in all 9 provinces. These workshops are also aimed at assisting provincial departments of Economic Development and government agencies that are involved in youth development to align their plans to the YEDS.

Furthermore, the department conducted provincial youth awareness campaigns with the purpose of empowering youth in townships and rural areas and encouraging them to fight poverty and unemployment by starting their own businesses. Early this year, we took this campaign to Nyanga in Cape Town where 400 young people attended; and Koffiefontein in Free State with 120 participants. The high numbers of young participants clearly demonstrate their eagerness to become self-employed and to meaningfully participate in the economic activities of their country.

We are currently developing a Mass Youth Enterprise Creation Programme (MYEP) that will be implemented over the next 10 years. The aim of MYECP is to increase the number of youth entrepreneurs participating in the mainstream economy.
The process of developing financing mechanisms to ensure access to start-up finance by young entrepreneurs is at an advanced stage. These finance options will be targeted at improving access to finance by young entrepreneurs through the provision of collaterals, grants and improving competitiveness and sustainability of businesses.

Furthermore, a range of financial reforms are on the cards to ensure inclusive growth, access and participation. It is going to be business unusual if we are to achieve the radical economic programme, however it must be noted, we are not going to be reckless or adventurous but radical, bold and decisive.

Partnerships have been formed on a number of initiatives with the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA), Provincial Governments and other stakeholders to identify business opportunities and develop young entrepreneurs. The youth in rural communities have been identified as part of rural Upliftment where cooperatives are being developed. Community Enterprise Development Officers (CEDO's) from 120 communities have been trained to originate deals, offer business advice and assist with loan applications. Currently, beneficiaries of this training are from Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and KwaZulu-Natal but the programme is spreading to other provinces as well.

Chairperson, women empowerment is still central to our plans as recognition that the majority of South African women in the past have been marginalised on the basis of race, class and gender. Therefore, there is a need to strengthen initiatives targeted at women economic empowerment.

Over the years the dti has developed mechanisms for ensuring the integration of women into the mainstream economy. These among others include the National Strategic Framework on Women Economic Empowerment which is being finalised; Technology for Women in Business (TWIB); Bavumile Skills Development Initiative; Isivande Women's Fund; South African Women Entrepreneurs' Network (SAWEN); Export support programmes for women; and Women on Boards training.

TWIB was introduced to address the underrepresentation of women in science, technology and innovation related business activities. It provides capacity building that enables women to embrace appropriate technologies and advance their businesses through technology applications, innovation and invention.

To acknowledge and crown the best technological and innovative women ideas we have introduced the annual TWIB awards. Indeed there are good stories to tell, one of the winners - DR Molefi Moretlo pioneered a product in telemedicine where medical information is exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications to either improve patients' health status or educate them. In 2013, the award was bestowed to Ms Dorothy Botse of Botho Ubuntu cleaning services.

B'avumile Skills Development Initiative targets 20 women per province and each year three (3) provinces are selected for training. Women are trained in applique pattern making, sewing techniques, doll making and tie dyeing. Women trained in KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and Northern Cape won contracts with a number of organisations to make school uniforms for HIV orphans and bags for municipal library.

Through the Isivande Women's Fund, the department approved a total of 13 women led projects to the value of R14,1m. This affirms that appropriate and well-targeted programmes can be successful and add value on the lives of ordinary women.

We will review the implementation of these in the coming year to ensure they are relevant and speak to the needs of women.

The global economic decline that started in 2008 hit our major trade partners in the Euro Zone and North America severely, thereby reducing the global demand for our products. One major lesson to be learned from these unfortunate developments was that we need to diversify our export markets. Given that our neighbouring countries and indeed most of Africa was not affected as much as our Western trading partners, there is a clear imperative to redirect our trade efforts towards these countries.

In this regard the dti is currently reviewing the National Export Strategy (NES) which aims to prioritise markets and provide specific export finance for manufacturing companies. We will be targeting the African region and the BRICS group as part of export promotion.

The fifth Administration will open a database of companies participating in our trade missions, pavilions and other international forums in order to integrate those who have not participated previously. We will do this mindful of the fact that quality can never be compromised for inclusivity.

Therefore we call on all companies who have not had an opportunity to participate in the international space to contact the dti and follow processes which will ensure they are included in the future data base.

The department will continue rolling-out initiatives under the National Exporter Development Programme to improve access for businesses throughout South Africa and enhance their export readiness. In particular, we will be focusing on developing the next generation of export companies so as to fundamentally increase the scale of SA exports.

Over the next five years efforts will be intensified to raise exports within the IPAP sectors to R5 billion per annum. A target for 2018/19 has been set to support over 2,000 companies through the Export Marketing and Investment Assistance (EMIA) scheme. The idea is that black sustainable industrialists should take advantage of this opportunity to grow their markets and business across the world through this scheme.

Africa has proven to be one of the crucial trade partners to South Africa therefore a strategy has been put in place to harvest the growth benefits that are presented by trade partnerships with key African countries. Trade missions, national pavilions and Trade Initiatives have been planned for the current year to create new markets for South African products.

A key component of this will be the creation of a dedicated Export Council focusing only on exports to the African continent. We are working in partnerships with Provincial Departments of Economic Development as well as investment promotion agencies to promote exports and investments.

Through MINMEC we will work to coordinate our investment figures and statistics in order to reflect the impact of these partnerships. South Africa needs to participate meaningfully within the global economy and position itself as a valuable trade partner for value-added tradable goods.

The dti will continue forging economic partnerships for regional integration and development to ensure coordination and securing trade agreements with the Tripartite Free Trade Agreement (T-FTA), the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the Southern African Customs Union (SACU).

I have just returned from Botswana where I was attending the SADC and SACU Committee of Trade Ministers on behalf of Minister Davies and we have made our position very clear to these platforms in ensuring that as a country we maintain our economic hegemony.

More focus on the African Market does not translate into neglecting our traditional trade partners, hence trade bilaterals will continue with the rest of the world targeting the extension of the AGOA, reviewing of the TDCA and BRICS.
The dti will use government-to-government platforms to advance bilateral economic cooperation with Africa and the rest of the world. To promote exports and investments, the department is committed to creating an enabling environment by addressing market access barriers (NTBs) and ensuring institutional and human capacity for standards and quality assurance for traded products.

The dti being the custodian of intellectual property has committed itself to champion the "anti-piracy" programme. This involves education, raising awareness and building capacity to implement the Counterfeit Goods Act, 1997. We have partnered with SARS customs, SAPS, NPA and FPB to bring maximum impact of the programme. We believe that together with our stakeholders we can eliminate the illicit business in pirated products and we will continue to coordinate the search and seizure operation. As such we will be launching a massive public campaign together with local celebrities to raise awareness of dangers of counterfeit goods.

Chairperson, we are also at an advance stage to review legislation that will deal decisively with issues raised by local artists, in particular the issue of royalties and needle-time and how these can be better handled to avert a situation where our artist die paupers. Once the legislation is signed into law, the dti will run a dedicated programme to create awareness in partnership with the Department of Arts and Culture.

Chairperson, the dti has made tremendous progress in support for Film and television sector since the introduction of film incentive in 2004. In 2008 for instance, there were 49 films shot and produced locally and that number jumped to 398 in 2013. Of these 256 were SA production, 77 co-production and 65 foreign productions. All these productions have generated a total of QSAPE of R8 billion with incentive pay out of R2 bn.

In 2012, Foreign Post-Production Incentive was introduced and this led to an increase in large production being serviced. It is worth noting co-production treaties that have been ratified with several countries including Germany, France, UK, Italy, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland.

This sector is important and strategic in that it generate foreign earnings for the country but more importantly it contribute about R3,5 billion into SA GDP and created more than 25000 jobs for the economy.

Going forward, we will finalise our engagement with the industry players including Directors, Actors, and industry associations towards the creation of an incentive for Black Film Makers during this financial year. This is particularly important to ensure the work we do is broadly supported and appreciated by the people we seek to serve.

Honourable Chairperson and Members,

His Excellency President Zuma has called on all of us to implement Radical Socio-economic Transformation. We echo this call and invite Business and Labour to form meaningful partnerships with the dti to ensure that our 'Good Story' becomes a 'Great Story'.

I thank you.

(Mzwandile Masina is the Convener of the ANC Youth League - National Task Team and a Member of the ANC REC in Ekurhuleni, Gauteng Province. His speech here is on his capacity as the Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. The speech appears here because it directly deals with matters that relates to young people.)

Deliberation on Presidency Budget Vote Speech by Buti Manamela

Deliberation on Presidency Budget Vote Speech by Buti Manamela

AN ART OF CONVENIENCE...INTO MASS MARKETING

Hon President;
Hon Deputy Speaker; and
Hon Members;

Mr. President, as you have correctly said, the responsibility of our department and the Presidency will be to go further than oversight of the National Youth Development Agency by "championing and monitoring youth development in government".

The youth of our country are at the center of the success of finally breaking the back of colonialism and apartheid, and building a new future for the country and nation based on the premise of the RDP and the National Development Plan.

The idea that young people are disillusioned and unwilling participant in the democratic discourse was disproved by the high turnout in the last elections, and therefore calls on all of us engage with the youth in a constructive manner with the youth on a new youth development path.

We are currently working with youth formations to review the National Youth Policy and develop an Integrated Youth Development Strategy as part of the development of this new youth development path.

At the centre of this new youth development path is the prioritization of employment, education and youth enterprise development.

Before the end of this year, our Ministry will be tabling proposed amendments on the National Development Agency Act. The purpose of the amendments would be to ensure that we strengthen the NYDA in its endeavor to facilitate, coordinate and mainstream youth development issues.

The National Planning Commission adopted a set of interventions, which they referred to as the "youth lens", which amongst others declared that we should "strengthen youth service programmes and introduce new, community-based programmes to offer young people life-skills training, entrepreneurship training and opportunities to participate in community development programmes."

This echo's the initial plans contained in the RDP, which called for "a national youth service programme [that] must educate, develop, train and empower youth, and enable them to participate in the reconstruction of society through involvement in service projects in the community such as literacy, welfare, and improving infrastructure"

We will mobilise young people in "youth service programmes such as educare and literacy programmes, health, environmental protection, rural and urban infrastructure development, and peace monitoring" as envisaged in the RDP to complement the more than 100 000 already enrolled by the NYDA and the work done by Rural Development through NARYSEC.

Hon Members;

Hon Mmusi Maimane says that we should scrap the NYDA. Well, the DA has said that about the NYC and Umsobomvu Youth Fund, and has said the same thing about the NYDA even before it was launched.

But how wrong are they about this call?

In August 2013, Pondering Panda conducted a Public Perception Survey of the NYDA. The survey found that 84% of our youth believes that the NYDA is an important and relevant institution to have in South Africa.

This comes as no surprise because the NYDA that Hon. Musi Maimane says should be scrapped in 2012/2013 gave a Second Chance to 8000 young people who had failed their Grade 12 exams, to rewrite, and have recorded more than 87% pass rate of those who repeated.

Potlaku Makua, an18 years old teenager from Sebokeng, passed her Matric through the rewrite with 5 distinctions and was subsequently given a scholarship worth R108 000 through the NYDA's Solomon Mahlangu scholarship. She is now studying Astrophysics with Wits University.

The NYDA that Hon. Maimane says should be scrapped has assisted 589 young people in getting Micro and Small Enterprise Grants worth more than R25 million only in 2013.

One of the recipients of the grants, BK Moleko, is a 26 year old young farmer in De Deur, South of Johannesburg, and used his Grant to purchase an irrigation system, netting, tools and fencing to keep cattle off his 10 hectare farm.

The NYDA that Hon. Maimane says we should scrap has structured one of the largest partnerships youth enterprise fund with SEEFA and IDC worth R2.7 billion, with R100millon already been paid out in assistance.

The NYDA that Hon. Maimane says we should scrap announced last week a partnership with SASOL, ABSA and MTN a "Step Up to a Start Up" which will see more than 15 000 young people access to information and support on how to become an entrepreneur.

Hon Maimane, you should admit that your call has no support, is misleading and finds no resonance with young people, especially the 6 million or more who walked into their offices and received support, a hand-up from this government.

We agree that there were problems, but you have to agree that there is progress in turning the corner and rebuilding confidence of young people in the NYDA.

The NYDA will not be scrapped. The NYDA will not be closed down. The NYDA will receive the necessary support from our government to ensure that it up scales the many programmes that it is implementing.

In fact, the NYDA is so good in some of its programmes that the Western Cape's office of the Premier is partnering with them on a "Drug and Substance" abuse here in Cape Town, at Atlantis.

We are turning the corner in supporting the NYDA to reduce their wage-bill, manage their finances better and improve their service to the youth of the country.
Hon. Members, Hon. Deputy Speaker

In his reply to this Budget Vote the Hon. Malema was in a celebratory mood looking forward to the first Anniversary of his party, the EFF. Last month, when he was speaking here in response to the President's State of the Nation Address, he said something profound, and I quote:

"Mr. President we are here in this parliament to put firmly on the table the agenda for economic freedom in our life time, which you and your current deputy president thought you successfully suppressed when you dealt with some of us."

He went further to say "on a personal note, this can only be translated to you by the only reliable minister you have your cabinet Dr Aron Motswaledi , le ge o ka itima metse o tla bona e nwele."

This has to be explained in context, because the leader of the EFF was simply saying that even if you expel him from the ANC, he will always find a way back into politics.

It explains how bad the idea of the EFF is and that irrespective of the propaganda that they may preach, it remains a personal project of an individual, and that individual is the Hon. Malema whose mission is to prove to you that he will always find a way, no matter how, to get to that which you thought you are disconnecting him from, the desire for personal power and office.

Let me take you down memory lane.

In the 1920's there was an incident in Germany. A young man who was supposed to be at the helm of the country's political elite was sidelined and ultimately elbowed from the limelight of German political elitism, dismissed as unstable and politically immature.

Not to be deterred from what he believed was a calling, a set date with political destiny, he started mobilising others who were moved by his 'rhetoric' and stood to benefit by his ascension to power.

Addressing beer halls, open public theatres and other available public platforms, he drew some of the German unemployed and working class into a singular vision and dream that their plight is not because of the global capitalist crisis of that time but that it was because of The Jews.

"They eat our bread".
"They sleep with our desperate and hungry wives".
"They keep our husbands from their homes".
"They are the scum that should be wiped out from OUR Germany".

The conditions of the working class in Germany drove them to believe in short cuts, half-baked solutions, demagoguery, political opportunism-and resorted to genuflecting before fake gods.

This happens often in history, although not a permanent or common historical feature.

Just as Marx wrote, "Hegel remarks somewhere that all great world-historic facts and personages appear, so to speak, twice. He forgot to add: the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce."

At the time of Marx, the clowns would not have reappeared on the stage of history as frequent as in ours to mock his dialectics and to expose our travesty at accepting these political frauds as the alternative to the society we desire.

Each time they appear in history, worst if they succeed, the transition Marx explained is reversed for lifetimes and workers struggles go on auto-reset. We are forced not to only deal with our own internal weaknesses, but to also divert some of our energies to personages whose efforts, at face value seem legitimate and genuine, but are in truth, a reversal of what our original task was.

The reason why the EFF is a painful idea is because it is not based on the cause and course of the people whom it claims its vision represents the working class and poor youth. It is the dream of an individual to be in office, whatever the cost.

Hitler, for instance, declared his ideology national socialism. It sounded nice and resonated with the people. In fact it was more popular than the socialism that the German Socialist Party pursued. Those who disagreed faced the wrath of beer hall drunks or the SS as we saw yesterday at the Gauteng legislature.

Those who were not prepared to push the workers into a German cliffhanger were labeled sellouts.

I am under no illusion that the desire for power and political office can surpass the need for a political vision that changes the lives of our people, as may ultimately be the case with the EFF.

But their politics have become more a function of public relations than real commitments to the people's discourse. It has become an art of convenience and has been entangled into mass marketing.

The messaging, even of the painful idea of EFF, is more of a strategy to get more seats than to truly liberate the working class and the poor, and has no consistency in policy or even commitment.

In fact, the EFF is the first political party to break its electoral promises by jumping into the buffet of parliament's menu. Justified why they are staying in parliamentary villages when they promised to go and stay in the informal settlements, and are inconsistent with the hot under the collar overalls that they only wear when the media is watching.

It is also more about attacking personages and subjecting them to persecution on the one hand, and saving personalities from current prosecution than leading a class into national revolution.

The pain of this personal project lies in the idea that we can decorate our foreheads with berets merely to illustrate our hatred to individuals whom we declared, opportunistically, to kill for; then to kill, and ultimately refused to wish them recovery when they are sick all in the name of an ideology.

The workers struggle in our country cannot be dependent on the short-term political misfortunes of individuals. We cannot be driven into struggles that are about people's change of fortunes or misfortunes which are presented as collective political setbacks when in real terms, the same struggles can be pursued through the same ANC and the liberation movement.

I am not a party hack. If at all I at times prefer the Party position over the class, it will at all times in the interest of the class. But the painful idea that we narrow the thesis even further, and prefer the person over the Party, makes me shake in my boots, because here, before our eyes, not Eugene Terreblanche as Hon Maimane suggested, but Adolf Hitler has come back from the dead.

I thank you

(Buti Manamela is a member of the ANC Youth League and the National Secretary of the YCLSA. A former Deputy President of SASCO. His speech here is on his capacity as the Deputy Minister in the Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation. The speech appears here because it directly deals with matters that relates to young people and a need to safeguard our democracy.)

Viewpoint by Sicelo S. S. Shembe

Viewpoint by Sicelo S. S. Shembe

26 JULY - MILESTONE IN THE STRUGGLE FOR AFRICAN FREEDOM

26 July is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years), so says those who care to count. It is a day that clearly tells those who care to observe that the year they are in has fewer days left. It is a day that leaves one with 158 days remaining until the end of the year. For Cubans in 1953, it became a day that clearly marked as few the days of their political hardships. Without Namibians, Angolans and South Africans knowing it, it was also marking the closer march by our people to their freedom. Thanks to the Internationalist character of the Cuban Revolution.

As we each day grow and learn within the Congress Movement, one aspect of life that the ANC leaders help us master is the art of forging unity at all times at whatever cost. It is the art that instils the spirit of forgiveness. It gradually but firmly establish changes in a young comrade's mind about a fellow human being. It teaches one that we are one human race. We should strive for equality for all and uphold human rights. It is this guiding light that has been passing without being physically seen from each generation of ANC leaders to the next keeping us bound by unfading love to our Brothers and Sisters elsewhere in the world suppressed and subjected to some hardships.

It is this learning that keeps us knowing that it is unfair, wrong and inhuman for the American people to keep-quite while their government enforces unjust economic blockade of Cuba and keeping some Cuban political activists in jail. As young people of South Africa, we should let the total freedom of Cuban people be one of our internationalist goal. We should engage through Facebook, Twitter and other online media means the young people of Cuba and United States of America to work together with us towards a future secure world, that would be safe and trusting where-in all of humanity will be truly equal and free.

The people who are in government today in the USA will not be in charge of government policy and programme in 2020, for example, some of the university students of today will be in one way running the affairs of that country. If we do as we have had Madiba teaches us the principles of forgiveness and humbleness through practice; practically showing the American young people that the Economic blockade of Cuba is a symbol of hardness of heart of the American society and portrays the American people as people full of hatred. The fellow young people of America will for sure support the process that can heal the wounds of their forefathers and make Cuba and America to be neighbours that trade and engage in various mutually beneficial activities.

We should not target only people who are into politics, we should befriend all, as business; academia; religion and politics have a way of influencing each other. If we can let this be our 10 year goal, we can see fruits. If we are to succeed we have to have our 25th National Congress having a firm and implementable resolution calling for the Release of all Cuban people incarcerate in American soil and removal of economic blockade against Cuba.

We do not need to do this through swear words on the streets or some impossible threats just to please ourselves and people listening, but through practical day-to-day actions that will keep our friendship with the Americans mutually beneficial and making maximum economic sense while also keeping our long standing friendship with the Cubans mutually beneficial and bringing maximum economic benefits.

As we are the organisation of people as young as 14 years, we should never be seen to be in a misinformed hurry, we should be concerned by a perfect outcome, thus laying a correct and firm foundation. What we cannot do - will be done by generations of Young Lions to come after we have out-grown to be Youth Leaguers.

One feels obliged to look a bit back in history, into some of our rich heritage. There is this song that tells of a change we have helped our society positively go through, 'Thina bantu bomzansi sizimisele ukwakha isizwe sama-Afrika...' a conversion of a very militant and revolutionary song that was sang as a final way of a painful send-off to a comrade-in-arms, a person you would have never hesitated to take a bullet for. Comrades remaining would sing it with meaning as they pay their last respects to a fallen comrade. Actually, the first version of the song says, 'Thina bafana boMkhonto sizimisele ukuwabulala wona lamaBhunu...Hamba Kahle Mkhonto...'

The Apartheid Regime made sure that our fore-bearers are visited by a necessity to sing this painful song. The regime would kill our people, unarmed and defenceless. When our forefathers opted to wage a military struggle as a response to the killings and oppressive laws of Apartheid it became necessary to have trusted, loyal friends who were to treat them as equals and help them get the necessary military training, political training, weaponry and other related resources. Russia and Cuba became dependable friends.

For we were not there, history tells us that 26 July 1953 became a day that changed the fate of the Cuban Revolution indirectly leading to the emancipation of countries of the African continent. For we are now here, we remain appreciative to the Cuban Revolutionaries who saw to it that Africa's people were freed from colonialism and apartheid.

Thus, 26 July - remains a milestone in the struggle for African freedom. Cuba's current Ambassador to South Africa has reminded a gathering of ANC cadres on Thursday, 24 July 2014 that their struggle has always been 'a disciplined struggle for peace, a struggle for justice and a struggle for justice'. His views were echoed by the ANC Secretary General, who said the diplomatic relations that this year marks 20 years between Cuba and South Africa is a friendly relationship of equal partners who respect each other and bound by a brotherly love. Therefore, as the young South Africans - we should forever regard Cuban people as our friends and equals.

(Sicelo Sabelo Siphamandla Shembe is a Chairperson of the ANC Youth League - KwaMthethwa Branch and a Member of the Riot Mkhwanazi District Interim Leadership Core of the YCLSA. A former NEC Member of SASCO and former President of the University of Zululand SRC. Writes in here on his personal capacity.)

The contents and views expressed in HLOMELANG do not necessarily reflect the policies and positions of the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL).